SEO Search Engine Optimization

Search Engine Optimization (SEO) is the process of affecting the visibility of a website or a web page in a web search engine’s unpaid results often referred to as “natural,” “organic,” or “earned” results. In general, the earlier (or higher ranked on the search results page), and more frequently a site appears in the search results list, the more visitors it will receive from the search engine’s users, and these visitors can be converted into customers. SEO may target different kinds of search, including image search, local search, video search, academic search, news search and industry-specific vertical search engines.

A magnifying glass hovering over several words - search, engine, optimization, focusing on acronym SEO

As an Internet marketing strategy, SEO considers how search engines work, what people search for, the actual search terms or keywords typed into search engines and which search engines are preferred by their targeted audience. Optimizing a website may involve editing its content, HTML and associated coding to both increase its relevance to specific keywords and to remove barriers to the indexing activities of search engines. Promoting a site to increase the number of backlinks, or inbound links, is another SEO tactic. As of May 2015, mobile search has finally surpassed desktop search, Google is developing and pushing mobile search as the future in all of its products and many brands are beginning to take a different approach on their internet strategies.

What is WordPress?

What is WordPressAccording to Wikipedia WordPress is a free and open-source content management system (CMS) based on PHP and MySQL. WordPress is installed on a web server, which either is part of an Internet hosting service or is a network host itself, the first case may be on a service like WordPress.com, for example, and the second case is a computer running the software package WordPress.org. An example of the second case is a local computer configured to act as its own web server hosting WordPress for single-user testing or learning purposes. Features include a plugin architecture and a template system. WordPress was used by more than 23.3% of the top 10 million websites as of January 2015. WordPress is the most popular blogging system in use on the Web, at more than 60 million websites.

WordPress was released on May 27, 2003, by its founders, Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little, as a fork of b2/cafe-log. The license under which WordPress software is released is the GPLv2 (or later) from the Free Software Foundation.

WordPress first appeared in 2003 as a joint effort between Matt Mullenweg and Mike Little to create a fork of b2. Christine Selleck Tremoulet, a friend of Mullenweg, suggested the name WordPress.

In 2004 the licensing terms for the competing Movable Type package were changed by Six Apart, resulting in many of its most influential users migrating to WordPress. By October 2009 the Open Source CMS Market Share Report concluded that WordPress enjoyed the greatest brand strength of any open-source content management system.

As of January 2015, more than 23.3% of the top 10 million websites now use WordPress.

As of February 2016, WordPress is used by 59.1% of all the websites whose content management system we know. This is 25.8% of all websites.

What is CMS?

Content Management System HeaderCMS is also known as Content Management System. According to Wikipedia CMS is a computer application that supports the creation and modification of digital content using a common user interface and thus usually supporting multiple users working in a collaborative environment. CMSes have been available since the late 1990s.

CMS features vary widely. Most CMSes include Web-based publishing, format management, edit history and version control, indexing, search, and retrieval. By their nature, content management systems support the separation of content and presentation.

A web content management (WCM) system (or WCMS) is a CMS designed to support the management of the content of Web pages. Most popular CMSes are also WCMSes. Web content includes text and embedded graphics, photos, video, audio, and code (e.g., for applications) that displays content or interacts with the user.

Such a content management system (CMS) typically has two major components:

  • A content management application (CMA) is the front-end user interface that allows a user, even with limited expertise, to add, modify and remove content from a Web site without the intervention of a webmaster.
  • A content delivery application (CDA) compiles that information and updates the Web site.

Digital asset management systems are another type of CMS. They manage such things as documents, movies, pictures, phone numbers, scientific data. CMSes can also be used for storing, controlling, revising, and publishing documentation.